Tuesday, 30 May 2017

The New Farm

Author: Brent Preston
Genre: Non-Fiction, Canadian
Type: Hardcover
Pages: 368
Source: Local Public Library
Publisher: Random House Canada
First Published: May 2, 2017
First Line: "All happy chickens are alike; each unhappy chicken is unhappy in its own way."

Book Description from GoodReadsThe inspiring and sometimes hilarious story of a family that quit the rat race and left the city to live out their ideals on an organic farm, and ended up building a model for a new kind of agriculture. When Brent Preston, his wife, Gillian, and their two young children left Toronto ten years ago, they arrived on an empty plot of land with no machinery, no money and not much of a clue. Through a decade of grinding toil, they built a real organic farm, one that is profitable, sustainable, and their family's sole source of income. Along the way they earned the respect and loyalty of some of the best chefs in North America, and created a farm that is a leading light in the good food movement.

Told with humour and heart in Preston's unflinchingly honest voice, The New Farm arrives at a time of unprecedented interest in food and farming, with readers keenly aware of the overwhelming environmental, social and moral costs of our industrial food system. The New Farm offers a vision for a hopeful future, a model of agriculture that brings people together around good food, promotes a healthier planet, and celebrates great food and good living."

My Rating: 5 stars

My Review: I picked up this book based on a friend's recommendation. I'm not a huge non-fiction reader but I liked that the book is set in my local(ish) area and I was intrigued by this big city couple trying to make their mark on the food industry.

I won't lie, I went into this book humming the theme song from Green Acres but The New Farm is so much more than a story about a couple leaving the big city to start a farm. Preston's writing is engaging and humorous and he isn't afraid to show his missteps or naive notions about what it would take - financially, time-wise or personally - to run a successful, organic farm.

He shares the hard truth about where much of our food comes from, how we can and need to do better for ourselves and our environment and how good quality food should be available for everyone, no matter their socioeconomic standing. Throughout the book he weaves in the social, economic and environmental aspects of the food we eat. He stresses that it's important to know where our food is coming from and how it has been treated from the very beginning and that we need to insist on better food for our health and the sustainability of our food industry and environment.

This book is well paced and you find yourself learning about sustainable farming, the good food movement, immigrant workers in Canada and so many other important issues all within the framework of a humorous and entertaining read. You don't have to have an interest in organic farming or know the difference between a rutabaga and a turnip to enjoy this book. This is a story about a family who wanted to do better and did. The Prestons challenged the food industry, small farming, who has access to organic food and much more.

I have a new understanding of our current food industry and a greater expectation for quality, safe food for my family. I now wander the food store and wonder where and how this head of lettuce or potato was grown. I want better food and plan to take better advantage of the huge farmer's market near me and even inquire about a local Farm Share.  

I'm so happy that I picked up this book. It is inspiring, educational, funny, honest, important and has helped to remove the blinders I've had about the food that I buy. Even though the issue of successful, sustainable organic farming feels like a huge challenge Preston shows that it is possible.

Highly recommended.

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